Date   
Colorado 14er Hiking Data

Bob K0NR
 

Here's some interesting data on hiking traffic on the Colorado 14ers.

https://gazette.com/news/colorado-s-ers-keep-getting-busier-report-shows/article_fa627818-ec35-11e9-8273-73869de51511.html

Number of hiker use days in 2018:

35,000-40,000: Quandary Peak, Mount Bierstadt

25,000-30,000: Grays and Torreys peaks

20,000-25,000: Mounts Elbert, Lincoln, Bross, Democrat

15,000-20,000: Longs Peak, Mount Sherman

10,000-15,000: Pikes Peak, Mount Evans

7,000-10,000: Mounts Massive, Belford, Oxford and Yale, Huron Peak

5,000-7,000: Mounts Harvard, Shavano, Princeton and Holy Cross, La Plata and Tabegauche peaks

3,000-5,000: Mounts Antero and Columbia, Missouri Mountain, Humboldt Peak

1,000-3,000: Castle, Maroon, Capitol, Pyramid, Blanca, Crestone, Kit Carson, Culebra and Little Bear peaks, Mount Lindsey, Crestone Needle, Ellingwood and Challenger points

-- 
Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com

Notable VHF Contacts This Weekend

Bob K0NR
 

I had several surprising 2m FM contacts this weekend.

On Friday, Joyce and I did "The Pumas" in South Park. While activating Little Puma (W0C/SP-128), I worked a strong station in Colorado Springs. Not a big surprise as I can usually get a signal up and over Wilkerson Pass and into the Springs. Then I heard a very noisy signal come back to me: WG0AT. Steve was at home near Monument and we were just barely able to work. Steve's house is tucked close to the Rampart Range (Mt Herman) so he has a wall of rock to the west of him. And he was only using an HT with a 20-inch whip. I had my 3-element yagi and 30W mini-mobile. I suspect we were bouncing signals off Pikes Peak...I can't imagine any other path. Truly amazing to make that contact with low power FM. (Recall that FM has the threshold effect and really suffers with small signals.)

On Saturday, things went the other way. We were on South Peak (W0C/SR-111) at 12892 ft. Curtis/KC5CW was on Blowout Hill (W0C/SR-057) at 8700 ft. Blowout Hill (love that name!) is not too far from I-70 and Dotsero, CO. I knew there was plenty of rock between us but figured we could get a signal through on 2m. Actually, I was hoping to work him on 222 MHz and 1.2 GHz but we didn't connect. We did make contact on 2m FM, with my yagi pointed in his direction but signals were not real strong. Last I heard, I was the only S2S that Curtis worked on 2m FM, which really surprised me. I suspect that Blowout Hill was just not high enough relative to the terrain around it.

On Sunday, we were on SP-042 near Cottonwood Pass. I worked Carey/KX0R on Thorodin Mt (W0C/SR-052) on 2m FM. He gave his summit as SR-052 and I thought he was probably somewhere not too far away. Later, when I was going through the log, I realized he was on Thorodin, which is 10,540 ft, a bit northeast of Central City. It is more of a "front range" summit and not a good shot from my location. I recalled that I had to point my yagi carefully to pick him out...the best signal was obtained by pointing due east (not the heading to Thorodin which is N/NE). This is in the direction of Pikes Peak, so once again I think that America's Mountain was reflecting the signal for us.

Yes, this is what makes VHF in the mountains so much fun for me.

73 Bob K0NR

--
Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com

Re: W0C/FR-004 - Contact Summary

Brad - WA6MM
 

Thanks for posting the link to that tool Bob!  I think I'll try using that since I usually have a lot of S2S contacts to re-enter.  This tool should save time!!
73, Brad
WA6MM

Re: W0C/FR-004 - Contact Summary

Bob K0NR
 

Brad is correct on entering the S2S contacts on the SOTA database. Kind of a pain.

A method that I have found useful is the G0LGS SOTA editor. You can enter your log into the editor, indicating the summit you were activating and the summit of the other station (if any).

First, you go to the SOTA database web site and upload the file as an activator log (csv format). Then you upload the same file as a Chaser/S2S log. On the second upload, the web site is smart about ignoring anything that is not S2S.

The software is here: https://www.g0lgs.co.uk/soft_info.php?AppName=sotacsveditor

A slight learning curve but not too bad. Worth the time if you are doing SOTA activations.

73 Bob

Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com
On 05-Aug-19 10:34 AM, Brad - WA6MM wrote:

Hi Dan,
Great job doing Pikes Peak the hard way!
Enter all of your activations (including S2S) as an "activator entry".  Then you need to re-enter all of your S2S contacts as a "chaser entry".  At the bottom of each chaser  entry it will ask you if this was a S2S contact.  Then you need to enter your summit info.  It's a bit of a pain but that's the process for now.  I believe they will eventually make this easier on us!!

73, Brad
WA6MM

Re: KI6YMZ Trip Report - Sneffels/Wetterhorn/Princeton

David Stillman
 

The San Juans got absolutely pummeled by snow and avalanches this spring. Attached is a photo from of my truck I took on highway 550 near Silverton on April 18th. Colorado averages 0-1 D4 sized avalanches per winter; this past winter we had something like 20 on record, not including the many in the backcountry that went unreported.

Dave KI6YMZ

On Mon, Aug 5, 2019, at 08:09, Scott Bastian wrote:

Thanks for sharing the photos, I have done all three of these hikes and really enjoyed the photos. I was in Ouray/Silverton/Telluride about a month ago and everything was till snow bound and not back country travel. I am glad to see they have gotten some of these roads opened up.   I tried to work folks from CA on HF but no luck this year.  It seems most of the 14er Activators are focused on VHF and up.  Thanks for slogging a HF radio up these trails.   I hope to moved to Parker this spring and I will be able to get out and do this event from a 14er next year    73 Scott AK6Q

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 


Re: W0C/FR-004 - Contact Summary

Brad - WA6MM
 

Hi Dan,
Great job doing Pikes Peak the hard way!
Enter all of your activations (including S2S) as an "activator entry".  Then you need to re-enter all of your S2S contacts as a "chaser entry".  At the bottom of each chaser  entry it will ask you if this was a S2S contact.  Then you need to enter your summit info.  It's a bit of a pain but that's the process for now.  I believe they will eventually make this easier on us!!

73, Brad
WA6MM

W0C/FR-004 - Contact Summary

Dan Huber
 

Here is a summary of our contacts from Pikes Peak - all were via 2m FM:

Total QSO’s: 12
Summit to Summit: 7
Longest Distance: 71.3 Miles (Mt. Belford)


Curious about entering the contacts SOTA database - do I enter all contacts in my activation log including the S2S, and then enter the S2S in the separate form? With only 12 I figured I’d just enter them manually.

73 de KN0MAP, Dan

First 14er SOTA in the bag

Dan Huber
 

G’day All,

Just a quick recap of our first SOTA activation of a 14er summit. Got a lot of “lessons learned” from this trip but will save them another time.

We chose Pikes Peak, W0C/FR-004, because it dominates the southern view from our home here in Woodland Park. We also decided that in the spirit of the event we would climb to the peak rather than drive up, so we headed out to the Crag’s trailhead and started our ascent around 5:15am. We had both summited the peak via this route before so we were pretty confident we would make our estimated 9:30am activation time. However, the one thing I didn’t account for was the extra weight all the HF gear added to my day pack, so what I thought would be a simple hike up the mountain turned into a grueling slog that had me sweating bullets before we even broke the tree line.

We ended up summiting at about 9:50am, and decided that since we were hearing other summits extremely well with the HT we would hold off setting up the main transceiver until later and just use the HT with a yagi. We made a number of contacts with other Summits as well as a few locals that were listening for me, and then started to realized that the ascent had totally drained me of energy and I had zero will power to go through the effort of setting up for HF. We made one final contact with N0MTN as he was wrapping up and then headed over to the summit house to warm up with a cup of coffee.

The BOSS (Beth, KN0EOD) had also decided early on that it would be prudent to take the shuttle down to the Devils Playground parking lot and cut off the descent through the boulders and she got no arguments from me. After a quick shuttle ride it took 2 hours to descend back to the parking lot, arriving just moments before the rain started to pour.

Thanks for all the S2S contacts and even the one F2F, and we are definitely looking forward to next year - albeit better prepared.

73 de KN0MAP (Dan) and KN0EOD (Beth)

Re: KI6YMZ Trip Report - Sneffels/Wetterhorn/Princeton

Scott Bastian
 

Thanks for sharing the photos, I have done all three of these hikes and really enjoyed the photos. I was in Ouray/Silverton/Telluride about a month ago and everything was till snow bound and not back country travel. I am glad to see they have gotten some of these roads opened up.   I tried to work folks from CA on HF but no luck this year.  It seems most of the 14er Activators are focused on VHF and up.  Thanks for slogging a HF radio up these trails.   I hope to moved to Parker this spring and I will be able to get out and do this event from a 14er next year    73 Scott AK6Q

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

Re: KI6YMZ Trip Report - Sneffels/Wetterhorn/Princeton

Brad - WA6MM
 

Nice report and pictures Dave!  That fox was not afraid of you at all!  I'm glad you made enough contacts to activate all the peaks you did. Great job.

73, Brad
WA6MM

Re: KI6YMZ Trip Report - Sneffels/Wetterhorn/Princeton

Bob K0NR
 

Dave,

Wow, some great photos! Take a look.

I have to agree with you about Princeton. Joyce and I activated that one last year and the last 1000 feet of vertical is just no fun.

Bob

Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com

On 04-Aug-19 7:12 PM, David Stillman wrote:
Hi all,

I took off work at 4pm on Thursday and headed straight to the San Juan range. I parked at the lower Sneffels trailhead at around 11pm and went to sleep in the back of the truck. I didn't set an alarm for day 1, as to get as much sleep as I could and not tire out early this weekend. I woke up around 6:45 and drove as far as I could on the gnarly 4wd road until I hit a snowbank around 12,200. From there I took the southwest slopes route where I ran into a fox (you might remember the photo in another thread) and did the 3rd class scramble up to the top. There wasn't any activity on 2m given I started a day early, but I made 14 contacts on HF SSB over a half hour. I talked to NS7P who informed me the contact pushed him past 120,000 chaser points!!

I went to Ouray for a burger, then drove up and over Engineer Pass into Lake City to check out the brewery. From there it was ~11 miles up to the 4wd trailhead of Wetterhorn Peak, where I once again camped in the truck. I got up a bit earlier and hit the trail just before 6 and summited around 8am. 3rd class scrambles at altitude are much more my style than long slogs up scree fields... Saturday had a lot of VHF activity so I jumped around 2m and didn't wind up setting up the HF rig at all, sorry California!

I hiked down with some nice folks and enjoyed lunch and beers with them in Lake City, then started the long drive home past Salida and up the 4wd trail to camp at 11k' at the base of Mt. Princeton. This morning I hit the trail around 7, not to summit until 10am - my legs were pretty well jelly by then, plus that last thousand feet of elevation is absolutely brutal in steepness and amount of loose rock. At times the only thing keeping me going was hearing Wayne/AD0KE calling CQ from the summit of Democrat - it really did put some spring in my step :) Like Saturday, I worked VHF only but had a lot of fun for an hour or so until the wind got cold and the clouds dark, and headed back down.

A bit of traffic on 285, then back home by 6pm - a great long weekend of mountains, radios, 4-wheeling, and beer!

Thanks to all, especially Bob K0NR for a great weekend. I had a ton of fun and look forward to it again the first weekend in August 2020!

Many photos are at the following link on Dropbox:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/guvbs0fqzfqokly/AADgfbV8GQSGomjH-_GXBdNFa

Don't miss the video of the fox walking right up to me (and peeing...), plus the marmots behind the yagi :)

73,

Dave KI6YMZ

Long's Peak Report from W4XEN (actual)

Caleb W4XEN
 

Hello from a very sore W4XEN,

I'm alive first of all! I made it.

I woke up at midnight on the 3rd after having gone to sleep at 5:30 pm the evening before. I had all my gear packed and ready to go.

I left the house around 1am Saturday and went to Village Inn in Brighton for breakfast with all the drunkies lol. I had a HUGE breakfast in preparation for the energy I was about to expend.

I drove to the trailhead and arrived at 2:40 or so. Sure enough, the parking lot was packed and cars were lining the road to the trailhead. I found a spot and squeezed in. There were a few people camping in their car.

I did a final check to make sure I didn't forget anything, which I did (my sunglasses in my Jeep), I had a false start but remembered my sunglasses about 5 mins into the trail and turned around and got them. 
So my final departure time from the trailhead was at 3am. There were a pretty good amount of people, like myself, all hiking via headlight up the dark path. I passed a waterfall and creek which I switchbacked by a few times before leaving the treeline.

It was nice hiking in the cool early morning. I really tried to not hike fast and pace myself accordingly, but nonetheless, after leaving the treeline and following the cairned path, the first heavy breathing kicked in. By the time the sun was illuminating the eastern horizon, I was just about to the initial boulder field up to the Keyhole. I learned that the Keyhole is more or less the beginning of the "hard" climb. Getting to the Keyhole was strenuous enough, but little did I know that what lay beyond the Keyhole was really one of the hardest mountain climbs I've ever done.

I donned my climbing helmet at the Keyhole, sun well above the horizon. A few people turned around at this point and I made a mental note that I wasn't going to be one of them. First stepping out past the red and yellow bullseye blazes was a little surreal. It kinda hit me as I looked down that a fall here and beyond could be fatal. I was scrambling on a ledge some 11,000 ft in the air, I was going north, around the western face of the mountain. I kept my eyes fixed ahead and to the left, but hardly any looking right/west as I scrambled. I don't consider myself afraid of heights, but I didn't want to take any chances of my stomach getting the better of me, so I just didn't look down so to speak.

Scrambling around a 14er was extremely difficult, but the hard parts were still yet to come. I made it to the "trough". Which as I learned, wasn't really hiking anymore, but rather a rock climb. I looked up the 2100' beast and though, Oh Lord...

I began my ascent up the nearly vertical scramble if you want to call it that, and began sucking air hard. My legs were on fire, sweat drenched. I found myself going up the Trough. After reading about it, (after the fact of course), this is one of the longest climbs in Colorado. Surely, had I have climbed earlier in the year, ice axes, crampons, and maybe even rope would have had to have been used.

The pitch had to have been 45° or more in some places. I was using my upper body just as much as my legs. Only a line of hard pack snow/ice lay to the north on the Trough but it was easily avoided. I leap frogged up the Trough with a few people. I could really only go 10-20 feet up before taking a 5 minute or more break. I've never done any hike/climb like this before. It was insanely difficult. Off the charts for sure.

After spending what must have been 2-2.5 hours in the Trough, I made it to the next portion, called the Narrows.

The Narrows is a ledge, wrapping around the north side of the mountain. True to its name, the Narrows is a 2-3 foot wide ledge of a path. To the left was good hand holds but the to the right...a sheer drop off down. At this point, adrenaline kicked in and I really didn't feel much pain in my limbs from the surge of it. I'm not a morbid person, but I activated my GoPro on my helmet just in case...at least they would see how I went. (Confirmed with a Park Ranger, this has happened before).

I slowly made my way around the ledge, picking out every hand hold and foot placement. Thankfully, the weather was great. A slight breeze and good temperature. No bad clouds in sight.

I made it to the next, and last phase of the ascent. Called the Homestretch, this part is again another near vertical climb up. Finding hand holds and footing, I inched my way up. I'm sure a fall here would have also been just as deadly. As a matter of fact, almost every place past the Keyhole was astoundingly dangerous. I don't know what energy source I was running on, but going up the Homestretch, I was digging deep within myself to keep going.

Ten feet from the top, I got yet another surge of adrenaline and heaved over the edge. Finally! I made it to the bounder strewn summit! I was a hot mess. I found an operating site, but due to the energy exerted, found I was reduced to gross motor skills only. I took a good 15 mins to collect myself. I starting looking at the time, my condition, and considering how long it would take me to do that all over again, but in reverse.

I decided to make a command decision and not setup HF. Deploying my antenna, gathering the mental faculties for CW, and responding to curious hikers, was enough for me to decide to simply pull out the HT and notepad and get some contacts that way. I laminated the PDF file listing all the simplex options and dialed into the first one. I was able to work 2 hams on Beirstadt almost right away. I heard, through them, that Bob K0NR was on the air. So I tried for him. I did, in fact, hear Bob, but he couldn't hear me unfortunately. I recorded 10 QSLs and 2 S2S's with Beirstadt. That was enough for me.

My thoughts began turning to the hike down. It was a little helpful with the gravity assist on the return hike but nonetheless, brutal.

After what seemed like forever, I had made it again to the Keyhole. I'm not sure if a lot of people turned around or it they just left the summit at a different time than I did, but there was only a handful within sight on the return trip.

Once past the Keyhole, I had something bad happen. I ran out of water. I sucked my water pouch in my pack dry. There was still a daunting 5-6 miles left in full exposure. This is when the fun began.

I had stopped sweating hours ago, mouth was dry, a headache was forming, and I still had a long way to go. I hiked and rested, hiked and rested, til I found myself in a cloud of pain from my legs and feet.

Around this time I got a "Ding" from my phone. I had cell service for the first time on this hike. Seeing as how I was out of water and some symptoms of heat exhaustion were forming, I decided to get out a message to my wife, Brittany. Text as follows:

Me: Call your mom [I was planning on asking Brittany's mom, who's a nurse, on the symptoms of heat exhaustion to see if it was just beginning or I needed to get help]

Her: Why?
Me: Stopped sweating about 8 hrs ago. No saliva or pee. Think I'm in the middle of heat exhaustion
Me: Still on trail moving at a snails pace
Me: Out of water
Her: Lovey!
[At this point, cell service dropped out and my next messages went undelivered]
Me: But don't call anyone. I have a survival situation plan [Not Delivered]
Me: I'm ok [Not Delivered]

When I saw the "not delivered", I thought oh no! The last info she got was that I was out of water and had bad symptoms. My survival was plan to simply rest near a snow melt stream I saw on the way up and re-hydrate with one of those. I actually did that by pulling the tube off my water bag and using it as a straw since the streams were not deep enough to submerge my bags and fill it up. I also asked like 2-3 hikers who passed if they had water. None was will to part with it which was somewhat understandable.

So as I sat there on a rock, drinking from a snow melt stream, I was fully expecting to see an SAR helicopter at any moment. I had it planned out that I was going to pull out my bothy bag, which has a bright lime green top, as an air panel. I also saw dollar signs flash before my eyes lol as a SAR helicopter probably isn't a cheap ride. But I spend about 30 mins there sipping water. It worked to great effect and I was rehydrated enough to carry on.

Had I also been in worse shape, I would have pulled out my HT and called for help, but I knew if I crossed that line, that would have certainly resulted in SAR activation. I was close though to doing that, and that would have been my course of action had the streams not been there.

I made it back to the tree line and to the waterfall/creek. Again I drank as much as my stomach would hold and pressed on.

About 1.5 miles from the trailhead, I ran into a platoon of rangers, whom I incorrectly called "park rangers." They corrected me to "climbing rangers." Anyway, they asked me if my name was Caleb. I laughed a bit at what my wife had undoubted done. I told them "Yes, but I don't want a job." :) They laughed and asked me if I was ok. I told them what had happened with the failed text messages, and with me using my water bag tube to re-hydrate. They chatted with me for awhile and asked some questions to see if I was coherent, which I assumed I passed. They offered me a Gatorade which I gladly took. My core temp was also high and they gave me an ice pack which I put in my shirt next to my chest to cool off.

Brittany had also posted in ham radio groups on Facebook and also emailed this group. I'm just glad a full SAR effort wasn't underway, not just because of the expense, but that it can also be dangerous for rescuers as well. The climbing rangers told me that they were free lol. Given the information she had, my wife acted accordingly. I should have rephrased my text a little better and DEFINITELY brought more water (3L minimum for sure).

So that is my 14er Event adventure.

Next year, I'm already claiming Mt. Bierstadt. :)

73,
Caleb // W4XEN 

Re: K0NR + K0JJW - Day 2 Colorado 14er Event

David Stillman
 

With any luck that will be changing in the coming weeks, as soon as I hear back from the FCC with a (zero included!) new call... I'm not holding my breath though!

Dave KI6YMZ

On Sun, Aug 4, 2019, at 19:48, Bob K0NR wrote:
Oops, David's call is KI6YMZ

(But half the time on the air, I put a zero in for the number.)

Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com

On 04-Aug-19 5:24 PM, Bob K0NR wrote:
Day 2 of the Colorado 14er Event worked out well for Joyce/K0JJW and me.
We activated SP-042, an unnamed summit about 2 miles south of
Cottonwood Pass.
This is a wonderful hike that follows the Continental Divide Trail, on
top of the world.
This is the third time we've activated it. Highly recommended.

I think there were fewer activators out today but we still had plenty
of action.
Most of our contacts were 2m FM but I was pleased to snag an S2S
contact using 2m SSB with David/KI6YM on Princeton.
I also worked Jay/W9RM near Olathe, CO at a distance of about 85
miles. Easy peasy on 2m SSB.
I also caught Bob/W0BV on 6m SSB.

The weather cooperated and only a single thundercloud was in the area
around 1 PM as we reached the trailhead.

73 Bob


Re: K0NR + K0JJW - Day 2 Colorado 14er Event

Bob K0NR
 

Oops, David's call is KI6YMZ

(But half the time on the air, I put a zero in for the number.)

Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com

On 04-Aug-19 5:24 PM, Bob K0NR wrote:
Day 2 of the Colorado 14er Event worked out well for Joyce/K0JJW and me.
We activated SP-042, an unnamed summit about 2 miles south of Cottonwood Pass.
This is a wonderful hike that follows the Continental Divide Trail, on top of the world.
This is the third time we've activated it. Highly recommended.

I think there were fewer activators out today but we still had plenty of action.
Most of our contacts were 2m FM but I was pleased to snag an S2S contact using 2m SSB with David/KI6YM on Princeton.
I also worked Jay/W9RM near Olathe, CO at a distance of about 85 miles. Easy peasy on 2m SSB.
I also caught Bob/W0BV on 6m SSB.

The weather cooperated and only a single thundercloud was in the area around 1 PM as we reached the trailhead.

73 Bob

KI6YMZ Trip Report - Sneffels/Wetterhorn/Princeton

David Stillman
 

Hi all,

I took off work at 4pm on Thursday and headed straight to the San Juan range. I parked at the lower Sneffels trailhead at around 11pm and went to sleep in the back of the truck. I didn't set an alarm for day 1, as to get as much sleep as I could and not tire out early this weekend. I woke up around 6:45 and drove as far as I could on the gnarly 4wd road until I hit a snowbank around 12,200. From there I took the southwest slopes route where I ran into a fox (you might remember the photo in another thread) and did the 3rd class scramble up to the top. There wasn't any activity on 2m given I started a day early, but I made 14 contacts on HF SSB over a half hour. I talked to NS7P who informed me the contact pushed him past 120,000 chaser points!!

I went to Ouray for a burger, then drove up and over Engineer Pass into Lake City to check out the brewery. From there it was ~11 miles up to the 4wd trailhead of Wetterhorn Peak, where I once again camped in the truck. I got up a bit earlier and hit the trail just before 6 and summited around 8am. 3rd class scrambles at altitude are much more my style than long slogs up scree fields... Saturday had a lot of VHF activity so I jumped around 2m and didn't wind up setting up the HF rig at all, sorry California!

I hiked down with some nice folks and enjoyed lunch and beers with them in Lake City, then started the long drive home past Salida and up the 4wd trail to camp at 11k' at the base of Mt. Princeton. This morning I hit the trail around 7, not to summit until 10am - my legs were pretty well jelly by then, plus that last thousand feet of elevation is absolutely brutal in steepness and amount of loose rock. At times the only thing keeping me going was hearing Wayne/AD0KE calling CQ from the summit of Democrat - it really did put some spring in my step :) Like Saturday, I worked VHF only but had a lot of fun for an hour or so until the wind got cold and the clouds dark, and headed back down.

A bit of traffic on 285, then back home by 6pm - a great long weekend of mountains, radios, 4-wheeling, and beer!

Thanks to all, especially Bob K0NR for a great weekend. I had a ton of fun and look forward to it again the first weekend in August 2020!

Many photos are at the following link on Dropbox:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/guvbs0fqzfqokly/AADgfbV8GQSGomjH-_GXBdNFa

Don't miss the video of the fox walking right up to me (and peeing...), plus the marmots behind the yagi :)

73,

Dave KI6YMZ

Re: K0NR + K0JJW - Day 2 Colorado 14er Event

Wayne Hall AD0KE
 

Wow! Thank you! What an amazing weekend! Democrat Saturday on vhf 2m fm and Lincoln today on 20m and 2m again. The chasers were amazing, and such a huge help. Thank you. I was able to spend 2 hours on Lincoln today and there was enough radio activity I would have been busy longer but needed to get back to base camp, and just in time for a downpour. What an amazing weekend. So worth the efforts.

Many thanks to all!

73, Wayne

On Aug 4, 2019, at 17:24, Bob K0NR <@K0NR> wrote:

Day 2 of the Colorado 14er Event worked out well for Joyce/K0JJW and me.
We activated SP-042, an unnamed summit about 2 miles south of Cottonwood Pass.
This is a wonderful hike that follows the Continental Divide Trail, on top of the world.
This is the third time we've activated it. Highly recommended.

I think there were fewer activators out today but we still had plenty of action.
Most of our contacts were 2m FM but I was pleased to snag an S2S contact using 2m SSB with David/KI6YM on Princeton.
I also worked Jay/W9RM near Olathe, CO at a distance of about 85 miles. Easy peasy on 2m SSB.
I also caught Bob/W0BV on 6m SSB.

The weather cooperated and only a single thundercloud was in the area around 1 PM as we reached the trailhead.

73 Bob

--
Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com



K0NR + K0JJW - Day 2 Colorado 14er Event

Bob K0NR
 

Day 2 of the Colorado 14er Event worked out well for Joyce/K0JJW and me.
We activated SP-042, an unnamed summit about 2 miles south of Cottonwood Pass.
This is a wonderful hike that follows the Continental Divide Trail, on top of the world.
This is the third time we've activated it. Highly recommended.

I think there were fewer activators out today but we still had plenty of action.
Most of our contacts were 2m FM but I was pleased to snag an S2S contact using 2m SSB with David/KI6YM on Princeton.
I also worked Jay/W9RM near Olathe, CO at a distance of about 85 miles. Easy peasy on 2m SSB.
I also caught Bob/W0BV on 6m SSB.

The weather cooperated and only a single thundercloud was in the area around 1 PM as we reached the trailhead.

73 Bob

--
Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com

Skunked on Sunshine and Redcloud

Terry Carter
 

Hi everyone!
I was skunked on Redcloud and Sunshine today.  First the hike:
Due to extreme/severe weather conditions in the area yesterday afternoon, the road to the main Grizzly Gulch Trailhead was washed out in three places, trapping people without 4x4  at the trailhead.  The 4x4s can still go over Cinnamon Pass and out to Silverton!  SO, I got to a temporary gate blocking the road this morning and turned around and parked at the Mill Creek Campground.  I planned to attempt Sunshine from the east slope.  At the campground, I ran into a man who had hiked the pair yesterday, and his car was still stuck at the trailhead!  According to him, SAR & Hinsdale Sheriff Department managed to get stranded hikers out after clearing enough of the road to get a vehicle up to the TH to pick them up! I saw the vehicle coming back to Lake City and it was some kind of military style people mover.  Anyway, he warned me about how fast and intense the storms were yesterday.  SO with all of this info, I started up the backside of Sunshine.  I got to treeline, and checked the clouds.  There were some ugly looking clouds gathering in several directions.  I was still one mile and 2000 vertical feet from Sunshine's summit.  After hearing the information about yesterday, I decided to call it. 

SO, on to the radio action: I set up my beam and radio to see if I could get any contacts.  Unfortunately, in this location, I was blocked by Sunshine, Redcloud and another 13er to get the line of sight to the mountains being activated today! So after 30 minutes, I ate some leftover pizza and started headed down. About half way back to the car, I made contact on 52 with KT0AM on Mt. Shavano using my Baofeng and rubber duck antenna... go figure.  At least I made ONE contact!

Weird day, but it turned out to be a nice hike.  Like we've all said before... there's always next year!  I'm in the process of uploading photos.  I'll send a link shortly!  Thanks again everyone for setting this up!

73,
Terry (KE0HNW)

Re: Good Day Today

Bill
 

I listened on 20m all morning and most of the afternoon, never heard a peep on HF at all from CO.   There was lots of activity on the band, and I made a good number of contacts,  but no 14er's.

Oh well, there's always next year.

73,
Bill VE3FI


Re: Good Day Today

Brian
 

From California I tried some HF contacts with any 14 er I could hear perched atop a 2.5er  that I ascended.   No luck, I could hear none. This was from about 1015 am Central to about 1045 Central.    I worked Ks, and Pa with my 5 watts, but not a peep from the mountain top crowd.  I tried on 30 m some, mostly 20 m.

Brian
N6IZ

Mark Molberg via Groups.Io wrote:
"How was HF?"

I made 6 contacts on 30m CW. I wanted to play more HF but the clouds were building and I decided it was time to get off Mount Belford. 

I tried 20m CW but there was a contest going on so I stuck with 30m.

I drove through Leadville last night and arrived at the 
Missouri Gulch trailhead last night. I hiked from 8 to 930 pm and set up my hammock. Got a good start at 530 this morning. 

Mark
N0MTN 


On Sat, Aug 3, 2019 at 3:40 PM, Bob K0NR
<bob@...> wrote:
Overall, it was a good day today for the Colorado 14er Event.
There seemed to be plenty of activity on 2m FM and people did a good job
of starting on 147.42 and moving up to 147.45 and 147.48.
(At least that's what I heard from South Peak.)

Brad/WA6MM texted me that he had to abandon the effort on Mount Yale due
to a foot problem. Ouch.

I did get skunked on the "exotic bands/modes": 2m ssb, 6m ssb, 222 fm
and 1.2gig fm. Oh well.

How was HF?

73 Bob

--
Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com





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