Topics

2m FM during the Colorado 14er Event

Bob K0NR
 

There will be lots of activity on 2m FM during the Colorado 14er Event. Unlike normal SOTA operation, it works best if we stay off 146.52 MHz...it will get totally overloaded.

Here's some info from the Colorado 14er Event web page:

FREQUENCIES:   The frequency plan on 2m fm band plan uses a "primary frequency and move up" approach. You might recognize this as a "calling frequency" approach, very similar to the accepted practice on VHF/UHF SSB operating. 

The primary 2M FM frequency is 147.42 MHz.  At the beginning of the event, operators should try calling on 147.42 MHz. As activity increases on that frequency, operators should move up in frequency in 30 kHz steps, consistent with the band plan for Colorado. Note that we recommend skipping the 15 kHz channels, as they tend to interfere with each other. The next standard simplex up from 147.42 MHz is 147.45 MHz, followed by 147.48 MHz, etc.  As activity increases, operators should spread out on the band. As activity decreases, operators should move back closer to the primary simplex frequency.  Some of the stronger stations (such as the stations on Mount Evans and Pikes Peak) should stay put on one frequency (NOT 147.42 MHz) and occasionally make a quick announcement on 147.42 MHz that indicates where you are listening.

We try to stay off the 2m fm calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, because it is so easy to overload it. However, if you need to make a call there to generate activity, go ahead but then move the activity back to the 147 MHz frequencies listed above.

It is a good idea to preprogram your radio memories with these frequencies so you won't be fumbling around with them at 14,000 feet. It will be helpful to be able to monitor more than one 2m fm frequency, so you can always leave a receiver on 147.42 MHz.

More operating info at ham14er.org

-- 
Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com

Brian
 

Hi Bob,


I tried Ham14er.org. The site seems to be a large advertisement ?

Regards,

Brian
N6IZ


'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
 

There will be lots of activity on 2m FM during the Colorado 14er Event. Unlike normal SOTA operation, it works best if we stay off 146.52 MHz...it will get totally overloaded.

Here's some info from the Colorado 14er Event web page:

FREQUENCIES:   The frequency plan on 2m fm band plan uses a "primary frequency and move up" approach. You might recognize this as a "calling frequency" approach, very similar to the accepted practice on VHF/UHF SSB operating. 

The primary 2M FM frequency is 147.42 MHz.  At the beginning of the event, operators should try calling on 147.42 MHz. As activity increases on that frequency, operators should move up in frequency in 30 kHz steps, consistent with the band plan for Colorado. Note that we recommend skipping the 15 kHz channels, as they tend to interfere with each other. The next standard simplex up from 147.42 MHz is 147.45 MHz, followed by 147.48 MHz, etc.  As activity increases, operators should spread out on the band. As activity decreases, operators should move back closer to the primary simplex frequency.  Some of the stronger stations (such as the stations on Mount Evans and Pikes Peak) should stay put on one frequency (NOT 147.42 MHz) and occasionally make a quick announcement on 147.42 MHz that indicates where you are listening.

We try to stay off the 2m fm calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, because it is so easy to overload it. However, if you need to make a call there to generate activity, go ahead but then move the activity back to the 147 MHz frequencies listed above.

It is a good idea to preprogram your radio memories with these frequencies so you won't be fumbling around with them at 14,000 feet. It will be helpful to be able to monitor more than one 2m fm frequency, so you can always leave a receiver on 147.42 MHz.

More operating info at ham14er.org

-- 
Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com

-- 
Pelagic Autopilot LLC

Bob K0NR
 

Hmmm. It is working for me.

Ham14er.org forwards to this:
https://sites.google.com/site/ham14er/
so maybe try that URL directly.

Bob Witte / K0NR / @K0NR / www.k0nr.com

On 28-Jul-18 6:41 PM, brian boschma brianb@... [ham14er] wrote:


Hi Bob,


I tried Ham14er.org. The site seems to be a large advertisement ?

Regards,

Brian
N6IZ


'Bob Witte (K0NR)' @K0NR [ham14er] wrote:

There will be lots of activity on 2m FM during the Colorado 14er Event. Unlike normal SOTA operation, it works best if we stay off 146.52 MHz...it will get totally overloaded.

Here's some info from the Colorado 14er Event web page:

*FREQUENCIES*:   The frequency plan on 2m fm band plan uses a "primary frequency and move up" approach. You might recognize this as a "calling frequency" approach, very similar to the accepted practice on VHF/UHF SSB operating.

_The primary 2M FM frequency is 147.42 MHz. _ At the beginning of the event, operators should try calling on 147.42 MHz. As activity increases on that frequency, operators should move up in frequency in 30 kHz steps, consistent with the band plan for Colorado. Note that we recommend skipping the 15 kHz channels, as they tend to interfere with each other. The next standard simplex up from 147.42 MHz is 147.45 MHz, followed by 147.48 MHz, etc.  As activity increases, operators should spread out on the band. As activity decreases, operators should move back closer to the primary simplex frequency.  Some of the stronger stations (such as the stations on Mount Evans and Pikes Peak) should stay put on one frequency (NOT 147.42 MHz) and occasionally make a quick announcement on 147.42 MHz that indicates where you are listening.

_We try to stay off the 2m fm calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, because it is so easy to overload it._ However, if you need to make a call there to generate activity, go ahead but then move the activity back to the 147 MHz frequencies listed above.

It is a good idea to preprogram your radio memories with these frequencies so you won't be fumbling around with them at 14,000 feet. It will be helpful to be able to monitor more than one 2m fm frequency, so you can always leave a receiver on 147.42 MHz.

More operating info at ham14er.org

--
Bob Witte / K0NR /@K0NR /www.k0nr.com
--
Pelagic Autopilot LLC


Brian
 

Indeed they both work fine on my PC and the Mozilla browser. Not so much on my little tablet computer ?

Thanks,
Brian
N6IZ

'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
 

Hmmm. It is working for me.

Ham14er.org forwards to this:
https://sites.google.com/site/ham14er/
so maybe try that URL directly.

Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com

On 28-Jul-18 6:41 PM, brian boschma brianb@... [ham14er] wrote:
>
>
> Hi Bob,
>
>
> I tried Ham14er.org. The site seems to be a large advertisement ?
>
> Regards,
>
> Brian
> N6IZ
>
>
> 'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
>>
>> There will be lots of activity on 2m FM during the Colorado 14er
>> Event. Unlike normal SOTA operation, it works best if we stay off
>> 146.52 MHz...it will get totally overloaded.
>>
>> Here's some info from the Colorado 14er Event web page:
>>
>> *FREQUENCIES*:   The frequency plan on 2m fm band plan uses a
>> "primary frequency and move up" approach. You might recognize this as
>> a "calling frequency" approach, very similar to the accepted practice
>> on VHF/UHF SSB operating.
>>
>> _The primary 2M FM frequency is 147.42 MHz. _ At the beginning of the
>> event, operators should try calling on 147.42 MHz. As activity
>> increases on that frequency, operators should move up in frequency in
>> 30 kHz steps, consistent with the band plan for Colorado. Note that
>> we recommend skipping the 15 kHz channels, as they tend to interfere
>> with each other. The next standard simplex up from 147.42 MHz is
>> 147.45 MHz, followed by 147.48 MHz, etc.  As activity increases,
>> operators should spread out on the band. As activity decreases,
>> operators should move back closer to the primary simplex frequency..
>>  Some of the stronger stations (such as the stations on Mount Evans
>> and Pikes Peak) should stay put on one frequency (NOT 147.42 MHz) and
>> occasionally make a quick announcement on 147.42 MHz that indicates
>> where you are listening.
>>
>> _We try to stay off the 2m fm calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, because
>> it is so easy to overload it._ However, if you need to make a call
>> there to generate activity, go ahead but then move the activity back
>> to the 147 MHz frequencies listed above.
>>
>> It is a good idea to preprogram your radio memories with these
>> frequencies so you won't be fumbling around with them at 14,000 feet.
>> It will be helpful to be able to monitor more than one 2m fm
>> frequency, so you can always leave a receiver on 147.42 MHz.
>>
>> More operating info at ham14er.org
>>
>> --
>> Bob Witte / K0NR /bob@... /www.k0nr.com
>
> --
> Pelagic Autopilot LLC
>
>
>


-- 
Pelagic Autopilot LLC

Jeff <jeff@...>
 

I can’t get the database to load on my phone. Probably a Yahoo problem. 


On Jul 28, 2018, at 22:28, brian boschma brianb@... [ham14er] <ham14er@...> wrote:

Indeed they both work fine on my PC and the Mozilla browser. Not so much on my little tablet computer ?

Thanks,
Brian
N6IZ

'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
 

Hmmm. It is working for me.

Ham14er.org forwards to this:
https://sites.google.com/site/ham14er/
so maybe try that URL directly.

Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com

On 28-Jul-18 6:41 PM, brian boschma brianb@... [ham14er] wrote:
>
>
> Hi Bob,
>
>
> I tried Ham14er.org. The site seems to be a large advertisement ?
>
> Regards,
>
> Brian
> N6IZ
>
>
> 'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
>>
>> There will be lots of activity on 2m FM during the Colorado 14er
>> Event. Unlike normal SOTA operation, it works best if we stay off
>> 146.52 MHz...it will get totally overloaded.
>>
>> Here's some info from the Colorado 14er Event web page:
>>
>> *FREQUENCIES*:   The frequency plan on 2m fm band plan uses a
>> "primary frequency and move up" approach. You might recognize this as
>> a "calling frequency" approach, very similar to the accepted practice
>> on VHF/UHF SSB operating.
>>
>> _The primary 2M FM frequency is 147.42 MHz. _ At the beginning of the
>> event, operators should try calling on 147.42 MHz. As activity
>> increases on that frequency, operators should move up in frequency in
>> 30 kHz steps, consistent with the band plan for Colorado. Note that
>> we recommend skipping the 15 kHz channels, as they tend to interfere
>> with each other. The next standard simplex up from 147.42 MHz is
>> 147.45 MHz, followed by 147.48 MHz, etc.  As activity increases,
>> operators should spread out on the band. As activity decreases,
>> operators should move back closer to the primary simplex frequency..
>>  Some of the stronger stations (such as the stations on Mount Evans
>> and Pikes Peak) should stay put on one frequency (NOT 147.42 MHz) and
>> occasionally make a quick announcement on 147.42 MHz that indicates
>> where you are listening.
>>
>> _We try to stay off the 2m fm calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, because
>> it is so easy to overload it._ However, if you need to make a call
>> there to generate activity, go ahead but then move the activity back
>> to the 147 MHz frequencies listed above.
>>
>> It is a good idea to preprogram your radio memories with these
>> frequencies so you won't be fumbling around with them at 14,000 feet.
>> It will be helpful to be able to monitor more than one 2m fm
>> frequency, so you can always leave a receiver on 147.42 MHz.
>>
>> More operating info at ham14er.org
>>
>> --
>> Bob Witte / K0NR /bob@... /www.k0nr.com
>
> --
> Pelagic Autopilot LLC
>
>
>


--
Pelagic Autopilot LLC

Alex Onken
 

I had to use a computer to get into the database.


On Sun, Jul 29, 2018 at 12:59 AM, Jeff jeff@... [ham14er]
wrote:
 

I can’t get the database to load on my phone. Probably a Yahoo problem. 


On Jul 28, 2018, at 22:28, brian boschma brianb@brianboschma..com [ham14er] <ham14er@...> wrote:

Indeed they both work fine on my PC and the Mozilla browser. Not so much on my little tablet computer ?

Thanks,
Brian
N6IZ

'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
 

Hmmm. It is working for me.

Ham14er.org forwards to this:
https://sites.google.com/site/ham14er/
so maybe try that URL directly.

Bob Witte / K0NR / bob@... / www.k0nr.com

On 28-Jul-18 6:41 PM, brian boschma brianb@... [ham14er] wrote:
>
>
> Hi Bob,
>
>
> I tried Ham14er.org. The site seems to be a large advertisement ?
>
> Regards,
>
> Brian
> N6IZ
>
>
> 'Bob Witte (K0NR)' bob@... [ham14er] wrote:
>>
>> There will be lots of activity on 2m FM during the Colorado 14er
>> Event. Unlike normal SOTA operation, it works best if we stay off
>> 146.52 MHz...it will get totally overloaded.
>>
>> Here's some info from the Colorado 14er Event web page:
>>
>> *FREQUENCIES*:   The frequency plan on 2m fm band plan uses a
>> "primary frequency and move up" approach. You might recognize this as
>> a "calling frequency" approach, very similar to the accepted practice
>> on VHF/UHF SSB operating.
>>
>> _The primary 2M FM frequency is 147.42 MHz. _ At the beginning of the
>> event, operators should try calling on 147.42 MHz. As activity
>> increases on that frequency, operators should move up in frequency in
>> 30 kHz steps, consistent with the band plan for Colorado. Note that
>> we recommend skipping the 15 kHz channels, as they tend to interfere
>> with each other. The next standard simplex up from 147.42 MHz is
>> 147.45 MHz, followed by 147.48 MHz, etc.  As activity increases,
>> operators should spread out on the band. As activity decreases,
>> operators should move back closer to the primary simplex frequency..
>>  Some of the stronger stations (such as the stations on Mount Evans
>> and Pikes Peak) should stay put on one frequency (NOT 147..42 MHz) and
>> occasionally make a quick announcement on 147.42 MHz that indicates
>> where you are listening.
>>
>> _We try to stay off the 2m fm calling frequency, 146.52 MHz, because
>> it is so easy to overload it._ However, if you need to make a call
>> there to generate activity, go ahead but then move the activity back
>> to the 147 MHz frequencies listed above.
>>
>> It is a good idea to preprogram your radio memories with these
>> frequencies so you won't be fumbling around with them at 14,000 feet.
>> It will be helpful to be able to monitor more than one 2m fm
>> frequency, so you can always leave a receiver on 147.42 MHz.
>>
>> More operating info at ham14er.org
>>
>> --
>> Bob Witte / K0NR /bob@... /www..k0nr.com
>
> --
> Pelagic Autopilot LLC
>
>
>


--
Pelagic Autopilot LLC

Jeff <jeff@...>
 

Me too! Database is not mobile friendly. 


On Jul 29, 2018, at 09:35, Alex Onken ke0rbf@... [ham14er] <ham14er@...> wrote:

I had to use a computer to get into the database.